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Często zadawane pytania

  • How can I apply for work in Poland or other country in Europe?
    By visiting our website, you've already made the first step! Now, you can fill out the application form, by following the link below. When you complete the application form and submit your application, our system will send to you an automated email confirmation. In this e-mial you will see links to set up your online job interview. Please make sure to click on the region you are applying from and are currently in.
  • What documents do I need in order to apply?
    To fill out the application form, you will need your CV and references (if you have any), and your passport. Without it we will not be able to apply for your work permit in case you turn out to be the right candidate. If the recruiter, after your job interview, decides that you are a good fit, they will send to you a document with instructions about next steps and other required documents.
  • Who is an agent and what do they do?
    An agent is an employee of an agency. Agents are people you will be in contact with in your home country. An agent helps our office employees such as recruiters at AuRoom to complete he recruitment process. After AuRoom recruiter decides to hire you, we will send all necessary documentation to our trusted partner agent in your home country, who will be your point of contact before you come to Europe. Agents (not recruiters) will help you book flights, get travel insurance and prepare all other formalities before their journey. After your arrival in Europe our employee (not an agent) will assist you with train travel to the place of work, or will arrange pick up from the airport to the work place. AuRoom employees (not agents) will help you with arrangements such as food, internet access, accommodation, etc. AuRoom employees will also be your main point of contact throughout your entire stay in Europe. They will help you with anything you might need in order to feel safe.
  • Who is a recruiter and what do they do?
    A recruiter is the first person from AuRoom you will meet after submitting your online application. They are your first point of contact, who will ask recruitment questions and talk to you about opportunities. A recruiter will then assess whether you are a suitable candidate for any of the job openings in Europe available at the moment. Recruiter's main duty is to guide the chosen candidates through the application process, provide candidates (via our partner agent in your country) work permit and necessary documents for the visa appointment. It's important for you to know that international recruitment is a team sport. It's an agent (not recruiter), who will provide you with immigration documents we send to our partner agent. They might perform last interviews and testing if neccessary. AuRoom recruiter with the help of our trusted partner agent will prepare you for a visa interview at the Consulate and for the journey after your visa is accepted. Agents (not recruiters) will help you book flights, get travel insurance and prepare all other formalities before their journey.
  • Who will be my employer?
    AuRoom Staffing Solutions based in Europe, will be your employer, who pays your monthly salary, taxes and social insurance. Before your departure, you will receive a copy of the work contract you will sign upon arrival in Europe, so you will be certain of who exactly your employer is, what salary you will earn, what are your work duties, or what your monthly costs are.
  • How much money can I earn once I get the job?
    Most entry-level positions for candidates for the jobs AuRoom offers can earn between 800 EUR to 1,000 EUR per month (after deduction of the mandatory taxes and social insurance costs). Job positions AuRoom offers often allow for extra hours, so in reality you will be able to earn even 1200 EUR in a month. In Poland, gross pay (wypłata brutto) is the total salary before any deductions, such as taxes, social security, and health insurance contributions. Net pay (wypłata netto) is the amount the employee actually receives after these deductions are taken out. For a potential worker from the Philippines, India, Africa, Latin America or other country, understanding the difference helps in anticipating their actual take-home pay compared to the initially offered salary.
  • How often is the payday?
    Salary is distributed each month on the 15th day of the month, for the month before.
  • How do I get paid?
    Salary is always distributed to your bank account once you get one in Europe (we will help you with that when you arrive). Your salary will be paid to this bank account every month. We cannot send your salary to a foreign bank account. Also, it's important to know that if you decide to use AuRoom accommodation or transportation, or you take our an advance before the salary day (we allow for max 500 PLN advance in one month) it will be deducted for your salary and the amount you receive in you account will be: NET salary (-) cost of accommodation (-) cost of transportation (-) advance (-) other costs, if any, you ask AuRoom to cover for you.
  • Can I send money I earn to my family abroad?
    Yes, but you must do it yourself. You can send your salary abroad using your bank account or third party providers such as Western Union, Wise, CashApp etc.
  • How long is the workday?
    Depending on the work position you will be hired for, a typical shift is 8-10 hours, with some instances of 12 hours. In all jobs it's important to meet the targets, and some jobs only pay for the amount of items/processes/things you completed. This system may seem harder, but in reality if you are good and fast in your job, you can earn more than in a job that pays hourly.
  • What’s the difference between hourly and piece work systems?
    In an hourly work system, employees are paid based on the number of hours they work, ensuring a consistent rate regardless of output. In a piece work system, employees are paid based on the amount they produce or complete, which can incentivize higher productivity but may lead to income variability. For someone from the Philippines, India, Africa, South America or Malaysia working in Poland, knowing this difference helps in understanding how their effort and time might translate into earnings. While working on hourly-work basis, employees are paid for each hour of work for performing their duties. While working in a piece-work system, employees are paid per each unit of executed duties. For example, while sorting vegetables an employee will be paid certain amount of money for each kilogram of sorted vegetables. Piece-work can be more financially beneficial for fast working employees. Regardless of this, if your job is hourly, you still have to meet the daily targets in order to keep the job.
  • Where will I live after the arrival to Poland?
    It depends on the job you are hired for. AuRoom has clients all over Europe, therefore there is no straight-forward answer to this question. In principal, we provide free or very cheap accomodation for all employees, which is located as close to the workplace as possible. It's always within the same city. It can be a hotel where other employees stay, or a rental apartment, where you will also live with your work colleagues. If accommodation is not close enough to work for you to walk, you can use public transportation or choose to opt-in for AuRoom transport for a monthly fee.
  • What do I need to bring with me?
    Here is a short list of essentials: Passport with work visa Work clothes (bring comfortable clothes, such as dress pants, sweatshirt, jacket, sneakers, a hat etc.) All neccessary cosmetics At least 300 EUR for your life expenses during the first month before you receive your first salary. Smartphone with a charger Medicine such as pain relievers, etc. (or specific medicine you can only get in your home country). You can also purchase all kinds of medicine and vitamins in Europe A UK/US to EU (European) plug-in converter.
  • Who pays for my accommodation?
    Accommodation in Poland is expensive. 99% of new arrivals choose to stay in the accommodation provided by AuRoom. it's a cheaper option, because you don't have to sign a contract with a landlord and pay for rent and utilities separately. Living in your own accommodation in Poland will never be cheaper than 1000 - 1500 PLN/month. AuRoom accommodation fee is never more than 600 PLN / month / person, depending on the location. It includes the utilities, garbage disposal, water, electricity, heating, AC, and internet. There are rules everyone living in AuRoom accommodation must obey, such as cleaning, recycling, not wasting water and electricity, not causing damage etc.
  • Who pays for my food?
    Cost of food is always the responsibility of the employee. Food in countries like Poland is much cheaper than in the rest of Western Europe - usually half the price or more.
  • Will I have health insurance?
    Yes. AuRoom is required to register all employees in the country's social health insurance system (paid for along with your income taxes). You will have access to the public health system, so you can go to the doctor, dentist, dermatologist, the hospital or call for an ambulance at no cost. You will also have an option of opting-in for private life insurance in case of an accident or serious illness. Private insurance is not free and monthly cost depends on the option you choose. AuRoom will assist you with this if you decide to get private insurance. We have negotiated better price for private insurance for our employees than average price on the market.
  • Will I have access to the doctor?
    Yes. Your social health insurance provides you with public healthcare system access at no additional cost. In Poland, the health system is primarily funded through the National Health Fund (NFZ), which is supported by mandatory health insurance contributions deducted from salaries (ZUS). Citizens and residents, including workers from abroad, are entitled to free or subsidized healthcare services through the public system. Services covered include visits to general practitioners, specialists, hospital treatment, and emergency care. While public healthcare is accessible, waiting times can be long, so some people opt for private healthcare services for faster access. Foreign workers need to ensure they are registered with the ZUS to receive public health benefits.
  • Will I have access to internet?
    Yes. AuRoom Accommodations have internet. You will also get a Polish SIM card with internet accessibility.
  • Where will I live after the arrival to Poland?
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  • How long can I stay in Poland?
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  • Will the agency help me with extending immigration documents?
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  • Is life in Poland expensive?
    Living expenses in Poland are generally lower than in for example Hong Kong but higher than in for example India. In Hong Kong, housing costs are particularly high, making it one of the most expensive cities in the world, with high prices for dining out, transportation, and entertainment. In contrast, Poland offers more affordable housing and daily expenses, though major cities like Warsaw can be relatively costly. Compared to India, Poland is more expensive in terms of housing, groceries, dining out, and overall cost of living. India has a lower cost of living, with affordable housing, food, and transportation, especially in smaller cities and rural areas. Thus, while Poland offers a moderate cost of living, it is significantly cheaper than Hong Kong but more expensive than India. Compared to the Philippines, the cost of living in Poland is generally higher. In Poland, expenses such as housing, groceries, dining out, and transportation are more costly than in the Philippines. Major Polish cities like Warsaw and Krakow have higher living costs, especially for rent and utilities, while smaller towns are more affordable. In the Philippines, daily expenses are typically lower, with cheaper housing, food, and public transportation. However, imported goods and certain services might be more expensive. Overall, living in Poland will likely require a higher budget than in the Philippines. Compared to the UAE, living expenses in Poland are generally lower. The UAE, particularly cities like Dubai and Abu Dhabi, has a high cost of living, with expensive housing, dining out, and entertainment. Utilities and schooling can also be quite costly in the UAE. In Poland, while major cities like Warsaw have relatively higher living costs, housing, groceries, and daily expenses are more affordable than in the UAE. Transportation and healthcare in Poland are also generally less expensive. Thus, overall, living in Poland is more budget-friendly compared to the UAE. Compared to Colombia, the cost of living in Poland is generally higher. In Poland, expenses for housing, groceries, dining out, and transportation are typically more expensive than in Colombia. Major Polish cities such as Warsaw and Krakow have relatively high living costs, particularly for rent and utilities. In Colombia, the cost of living is lower, with more affordable housing, food, and daily expenses. Cities like Bogotá and Medellín offer a lower overall cost of living compared to Polish cities. Thus, while living in Poland might require a higher budget, Colombia offers a more economical lifestyle in comparison. Compared to Zimbabwe, the cost of living in Poland is generally higher. In Poland, expenses such as housing, groceries, dining out, and transportation are typically more expensive than in Zimbabwe. Major Polish cities like Warsaw and Krakow have higher living costs, particularly for rent and utilities. In Zimbabwe, the cost of living is lower, with more affordable housing, food, and daily expenses. However, economic instability in Zimbabwe can lead to fluctuating prices and limited availability of certain goods and services. Overall, while Poland offers a higher standard of living, Zimbabwe provides a more economical lifestyle for many. From the experience of our current employees, an average monthly cost of essential food, cosmetics, transportation, basic entertainment and other essentials for one person is around 150 - 200 EUR.
  • Can Polish people speak English?
    Yes, most Polish citizens can speak English on at least communicative level. Our employees and agents (your point of contact) speak fluent English. Your work supervisors will also speak English.
  • How long can I stay in Poland or other country in Europe?
    Your AuRoom work permit will be valid for 3 years. However, your visa will allow you to stay in Poland or other European countries for no longerthan 12 months. If you choose to stay longer, you can apply for a Temporary Residence Card (TRC), which is valid for 3 years and can be later renewed or changed into Permanent Residence Card. AuRoom will monitor your legal immigration situation and will inform you when it is time to start thinking and bout the TRC application. Our official partner - Poland TRC law firm offers the best price on the market for AuRoom employees for starting and overseeing the TRC application process. We highly recommend to use www.polandtrc.com for the TRC process, if you don't want to extremely overpay to other TRC service providers. This way you can be sure that your case will be monitored both by AuRoom and Poland TRC and the process will be much faster than if you choose a wrong provider. If you prove to be a good worker and wish to extend your stay, AuRoom will make the adequate arrangements to extend your work permit or help you apply for the TRC, which allows for a prolonged stay and ability to travel across Europe.
  • What is the weather like in Poland?
    Poland has four seasons - spring, summer, fall and winter. Temperatures vary from -10C to +30C. It snows from December to February. It is best to be prepared for any kind of weather.
  • Is life in Poland expensive?
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  • How many Filipinos are there already in Poland?
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  • What is the weather like in Poland?
    The weather in Poland varies throughout the year due to its continental climate. Summers (June to August) are generally warm, with temperatures ranging from 20°C to 30°C (68°F to 86°F), sometimes reaching higher. It's the best time for outdoor activities and exploring the country. Autumn (September to November) brings cooler temperatures, ranging from 5°C to 15°C (41°F to 59°F). The foliage turns vibrant colors, making it a picturesque time to visit. Winters (December to February) are cold, with temperatures often dropping below freezing, especially in the eastern and northern regions. Snowfall is common, creating a beautiful winter landscape. Temperatures range from -5°C to 0°C (23°F to 32°F) on average. Spring (March to May) is a transitional season, with temperatures gradually warming up. It's a time of renewal, with flowers blooming and outdoor activities resuming. Temperatures range from 5°C to 15°C (41°F to 59°F) during this time. Overall, Poland experiences distinct seasons, offering diverse and enjoyable weather conditions throughout the year.
  • What is the dominant religion in Poland?
    The dominant religion in Poland is Christianity, with the majority of the population adhering to Roman Catholicism. Catholicism has deep historical and cultural roots in Poland and plays a significant role in society, including influencing social norms and traditions. Other religions in Poland, such as Eastern Orthodoxy, Protestantism, Judaism, and Islam, are present but represent smaller minority groups. While religious freedom is guaranteed by the Polish constitution, there have been instances of societal tensions or discrimination against religious minorities, particularly in more conservative areas. In recent years, there have been efforts to promote tolerance and acceptance of religious diversity in Poland, but challenges remain, particularly concerning social attitudes and political discourse. Overall, while Poland is predominantly Catholic, efforts to foster inclusivity and respect for religious diversity are ongoing.
  • How is the coronavirus (COVID-19) situation in Poland?
    Although it's a very subjective statement, the COVID-19 situation in Poland is not severe and almost forgotten. More details, including daily number of cases, can be found here (statistics by worldometers.info).
  • Do I have to quarantine after my arrival in Poland?
    Not anymore.
  • What if I'm not vaccinated and I haven't recovered from COVID-19?
    There are no more restrictions with regards to the vaccination.
  • Do I have to register somewhere before my flight to Poland?
    Not anymore.
  • What are the current COVID-19 restrictions in Poland?
    Although there are no official restrictions in place anymore, covering the mouth and nose in public spaces is recommended for your own health and safety.

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